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Are Carbon Fiber Helmets Worth the Money?

With carbon fiber helmets costing from $200 to $2000, you might think it’s best to stick to the cheaper fiberglass or plastic helmets. 

 

After all, isn’t a helmet something you just wear on your head for protection? Should you just find something that fits? Let’s stop being so damn cheap and buy something that can actually protect you from fatal head injuries. After all, we spend thousands upon thousands on our motorcycles. If we can afford a Harley Davidson, certainly we can afford a high quality helmet.

 

Yes, fiberglass meets the standards. However, you shouldn’t mind spending a few extra dollars when safety is concerned.

 

If you aren’t familiar with the many great attributes of having a carbon fiber helmet, read on.

 

A Material Ten Times Stronger Than Steel

A carbon fiber helmet’s strength and durability makes it a great investment. It’s what sets the product apart from it’s traditional counterparts.

 

Carbon fiber is made by combining minute carbon atoms together with resin. This partnership makes carbon fiber strong enough to compete with steel and aluminum.

 

In fact, it crushed the two metals in the category. It’s ten and eight times stronger than steel and aluminum respectively. 

 

A Unique Property Carbon Fiber Has That Can Save Your Life

The resin doesn't only bind the woven carbon fibers together. It also helps distribute the transfer of load between fibers upon impact. Distributing the force among the entire surface dilutes the impact. This property can save you from skull-crushing injuries.

 

In comparison, a fiberglass helmet will keep the force centralized to the impact area. A large energy transfer in one area makes you more vulnerable to head injuries.

 

Check out videos on Youtube if you’re still not convinced. Some riders test the strength and durability of their carbon fiber helmets by running them over with a truck. 

 

The Best-Looking Helmets You’ll Ever Wear

Strength and lightness aren't the only reason people buy carbon fiber. Looks also play a huge part in the decision-making process.

 

For example: Skull Crush sells wicked, low-profile lids that warrant double-takes everywhere you go. Both the mate and clear finishes look equally clean and perfectly crafted. An obvious sign that a lot of time and dedication is spent on every square inch of a Skull Crush helmet.

 

The Inside Is Just As Good As The Outside

What sets our carbon fiber helmets apart is the consistent quality inside as well as outside of the shell. Our helmets use Ensolite, a special kind of foam developed by NASA. This moisture-resistant memory padding absorbs energy. This also aids in the reduction of impact intensity.

Lightweight, Comfortable and Versatile

Yes, Skull Crush sells DOT helmets for those who still have faith in the DOT testing system, but Carbon fiber helmets are definitely more durable than traditional DOT helmets. They have higher crack and scratch-resistance than their counterparts.

 

They’re not the “Holy Grail” of helmets for nothing. They’re 8 to 12 ounces lighter than your typical fiberglass DOT helmet. It might not seem much at first sight, but your neck will  appreciate the difference when you are a couple of hours into a long ride.

 

They’re also perfect for all kinds of weather. The material adjusts well on cold climates. The expansion and shrinkage of traditional helmet materials doesn’t play a part in Skull Crush helmets. The durability, fit, and function will remain consistent in any season.

 

The Bottom Line

Yes, carbon fiber helmets are expensive, but you can’t deny that they’re a good long-term investment. It’s super light weight helmet and possesses an unparalleled level of shock suppression. The low profile look is also a definite plus.

 

If you’re the intelligent consumer who doesn't mind spending a little more to protect yourself, Skull Crush helmets are for you.  They’re  worth every penny. Once you own Skull Crush helmet, you'll never settle for anything less.

 

November 02, 2014 by Ralph Rodriguez
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